Letter of Support for George Floyd and the Black Community

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On behalf of the Rime Buddhist Center, I and the Rime Board of Directors want to express our sadness for the murder of George Floyd and all Black people who have been killed and oppressed over the last 400 years. The death of George Floyd is unacceptable and he is another victim in a long list of violence towards the Black community at the hands of police that must stop.

White supremacy and racist social systems have been the cause for so much suffering in our country. We have compassion for the pain and suffering that all this violence causes throughout our nation. We do not want fathers being ripped away from their children, leaving them traumatized for the rest of their lives. Mothers seeing their sons’ lives cut short in such violent ways, leaving them with the pain of losing their child.

It is time for us as a nation to wake up and take responsibility for 400 years of slavery and white supremacy which the wealth of this country was built on. To deny our guilt and ignore our history only perpetuates in traumatizing the Black community. We must not allow fear to continue to manifest into anger and hate. To heal the trauma of the Black community is to heal our nation as a whole.

We call for justice for George Floyd and the Black community who have been traumatized by white supremacy and systematic police violence and brutality. We understand that to try and heal the symptoms of racist inequality will never heal our society. It is only until we cure the cause of suffering, white supremacy, that our nation can heal. We call on cities, local and state agencies to demilitarize their police departments and root out racist policies and practices that have created racial inequities that continue to harm Black communities.

We call on our Rime membership to raise their voice in support of finding justice for George Floyd and the Black community. We also ask for those who can to help One Struggle KC and SURJ-KC with their efforts for #OperationLiberation which aims to assist with freeing Black people held in pretrial detention.

#OperationLiberation

Lama Matthew Palden Gocha
Spiritual Director
Rime Buddhism Center

Rime Social Justice Film Screening-Hale County This Morning

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 7:45 PM

In Hale County This Morning, This Evening, Ross offers an inspired and intimate portrait of a place and its people. The film presents Daniel Collins and Quincy Bryant, two young African American men from rural Hale County, Alabama, over the course of five years. Collins attends college in search of opportunity while Bryant becomes a father to an energetic son in an open-ended, poetic form that privileges the patiently observed interstices of their lives. The audience is invited to experience the mundane and monumental, birth and death, the quotidian and the sublime, all of which combine to communicate the region’s deep culture and glimpse the complex ways the African American community’s collective image is integrated into America’s visual imagination.

Rime Center Social Justice – Fall Book Discussion

Tuesday, October 15, 2019 at 7:45 PM

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. At its core, racism is a powerful system that creates false hierarchies of human value; its warped logic extends beyond race, from the way we regard people of different ethnicities or skin colors to the way we treat people of different sexes, gender identities, and body types. Racism intersects with class and culture and geography and even changes the way we see and value ourselves. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilities—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their poisonous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves. Continue reading

Rime Social Justice Film Screening – Slavery by Another Name

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 at 7:45 PM

Slavery by Another Name is a 90-minute documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. The film tells how even as chattel slavery came to an end in the South in 1865, thousands of African Americans were pulled back into forced labor with shocking force and brutality. It was a system in which men, often guilty of no crime at all, were arrested, compelled to work without pay, repeatedly bought and sold, and coerced to do the bidding of masters. Tolerated by both the North and South, forced labor lasted well into the 20th century. Continue reading

Rime Social Justice Committee partners with The Innocence Project-Missouri

The Social Justice Committee is pleased to announce this fall’s topic study will be wrongful convictions. On September 23rd, The Innocence Project will be in attendance for the Sunday service. On October 16th, the film screening will be Time Simply Passes. The film screening will begin at 7:45. The social justice book title for the fall is Blind Injustice: A Former Prosecutor Exposes the Psychology and Politics of Wrongful Convictions The book will be for sale in the bookstore in September. Discussion of the book will be on November 13th. at 7:45pm. All are welcome to participate.